China crackdown on Apple store hits holy book apps, Audible | KSTP.com

China crackdown on Apple store hits holy book apps, Audible

FILE - In this Sept. 28, 2021 file photo, people wearing face masks to help curb the spread of the coronavirus try out the latest iPhone 13 handsets at an Apple Store in Beijing. Amazon’s audiobook service Audible and phone apps for reading the holy books of Islam and Christianity have disappeared from the Apple store in mainland China, in the latest examples of the country’s tightening rules for internet firms. Audible said in a statement Friday, Oct. 15, that it removed its app from the Apple store in mainland China last month “due to permit requirements.” Photo: AP Photo/Andy Wong. FILE - In this Sept. 28, 2021 file photo, people wearing face masks to help curb the spread of the coronavirus try out the latest iPhone 13 handsets at an Apple Store in Beijing. Amazon’s audiobook service Audible and phone apps for reading the holy books of Islam and Christianity have disappeared from the Apple store in mainland China, in the latest examples of the country’s tightening rules for internet firms. Audible said in a statement Friday, Oct. 15, that it removed its app from the Apple store in mainland China last month “due to permit requirements.”

Associated Press
Created: October 15, 2021 03:29 PM

Amazon's audiobook service Audible and phone apps for reading the holy books of Islam and Christianity have disappeared from the Apple store in mainland China, in the latest examples of the country's tightening rules for internet firms.

Audible said in a statement Friday that it removed its app from the Apple store in mainland China last month "due to permit requirements."

The makers of apps for reading and listening to the Quran and Bible say their apps have also been removed from Apple's China-based store at the government's request.

Apple didn't immediately return requests for comment Friday.

Pakistan Data Management Services, which makes the Quran Majeed app, said it's awaiting more information from China's internet authority about how it can be restored. The app has nearly 1 million users in China and about 40 million worldwide, said the Karachi-based company.

Those who had already downloaded the app can still use it, said Hasan Shafiq Ahmed, the company's head of growth and relationships.

"We are looking to figure out what documentation is needed to get approval from Chinese authorities so the app can be restored," he said in an email.

The maker of a Bible app said it also removed its app from the Apple store in China after learning from Apple's App Store review process that it needed special permission to distribute an app with "book or magazine content." Olive Tree Bible Software, based in Spokane, Washington, said it's now reviewing the requirements to obtain the necessary permit "with the hope that we can restore our app to China's App Store and continue to distribute the Bible worldwide."

The Council on American-Islamic Relations condemned Apple's actions, saying the company was enabling China's religious persecution of Muslims and others.

"This decision must be reversed," said a statement from CAIR's national deputy director, Edward Ahmed Mitchell. "If American corporations don't grow a spine and stand up to China right now, they risk spending the next century subservient to the whims of a fascist superpower."

The removals were first detected this week by AppleCensorship, a website that monitors Apple's app store to detect when apps have been blocked, especially in China and other countries with authoritarian governments.

This week, Microsoft said that it would shut down its main LinkedIn service in China later this year for the same reasons.


(Copyright 2021 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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