Confirmation Hearings for Kavanaugh to Start Sept. 4

In this Aug. 7, 2018, photo, President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, officiates at the swearing-in of Judge Britt Grant to take a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit at the U.S. District Courthouse in Washington. Photo: AP/J. Scott Applewhite
In this Aug. 7, 2018, photo, President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, officiates at the swearing-in of Judge Britt Grant to take a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit at the U.S. District Courthouse in Washington.

August 10, 2018 03:21 PM

The Senate will begin the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Sept. 4.

Sen. Chuck Grassley, the Republican chairman of the Judiciary Committee, says the committee will launch up to four days of review that Tuesday, beginning with opening remarks from senators.

Advertisement

RELATED: Kavanaugh's Bush White House Role Emerges in New Documents

Kavanaugh will face questions Wednesday, Sept. 5, followed by testimony from legal experts and people who know the judge.

Republicans are eager to confirm President Donald Trump's nominee ahead of the new court session Oct. 1, as Justice Anthony Kennedy retires. Democrats have complained Republicans are rushing the process for the lifetime appointment without proper vetting of Kavanaugh's record.

RELATED: GOP Senators Rave About Kavanaugh; Dems Prepare to Grill Him

Grassley said Friday there's "plenty of time" to review the documents but added it's time for Americans "to hear directly" from Kavanaugh.

Credits

The Associated Press

(Copyright 2018 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

Advertisement

Significant increase in e-cig use among youth prompts strong warning from US surgeon general

St. Louis Park suspends enforcement of controversial crime-free, drug-free ordinance

Little if any progress as partial government shutdown looms

Chicago police: 2 officers die after being struck by train

Concerns raised over state ending Competency Restoration Program

Advertisement