Salvation Army toy shortage could leave 4,000 kids without presents

December 06, 2018 07:54 PM

The Salvation Army reports they are dangerously low on toy donations in the Twin Cities. 

According to a release sent out by The Salvation Army, the organization needs enough toys to serve about 19,000 children this holiday season, however current inventory levels suggest they will only be able to accommodate 15,000 children. The shortfall must be filled before the Salvation Army's metro area toy distributions begin on Dec. 18. 

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Listed below are the age categories for which the Salvation Army is most in need of toys, and the exact toy shortage associated with each group:

  • 0-to-2 years old: Toys needed for 700 kids
  • Boys 6-to-9 years old: 500 kids
  • Boys 10 years old and older: 975 kids
  • Girls 6-to-9 years old: 680 kids
  • Girls 10 years old and older: 1,000 kids

Current inventory levels are adequate for boys and girls ages 3 to 5, according to the release. 

There are many ways to help The Salvation Army provide toys for Twin Cities children in need by giving in any of the following ways: 

  • Donate online
  • Drop off new, unwrapped toys at The Salvation Army's headquarters, located at 2445 Prior Avenue North in Roseville
  • Buy toys online and have them shipped to The Salvation Army
  • Drop off new, unwrapped toys at any of the seven Salvation Army worship and service centers in the Twin Cities 

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Credits

Lindsey Brown & Tommy Wiita

Copyright 2018 - KSTP-TV, LLC A Hubbard Broadcasting Company

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