Advertisement

St. Louis Park council to discuss decision to drop Pledge of Allegiance

Updated: June 28, 2019 06:22 PM

It's 31 words and takes about 10 seconds to say. But, the decision to drop the Pledge of Allegiance from the start of St. Louis Park City Council Meetings has council members getting an earful.

The item was tucked away at the bottom of the June 17 agenda and the discussion and vote seemed innocuous and only took a few minutes. But the public's response to that vote exploded and has grown every day since.

Advertisement

"It blew up on social media," Floyd Nagler said, a Vietnam veteran who said the decision really struck a nerve with those who have served. Nagler used to live in St. Louis Park and says veterans everywhere are talking about the decision.

RELATED: St. Louis Park City Council drops Pledge of Allegiance

"It gives you that focus that this is the country we are here for," Nagler said. "From our perspective, the Vietnam veterans I've talked with are hurting a lot more over this."

St. Louis Park officials, including the mayor, City Council members and the city spokesperson did not make themselves available to 5 EYEWITNESS News Friday to talk about the decision. In fact, many of the voicemail boxes of the council members KSTP tried to reach were full. Officials did confirm City Council members are going to "revisit" the issue during a meeting coming up July 8.


It wasn't until the mid-1950s when the Pledge of Allegiance in its current form came to be.


During the meeting, Council Member Tim Brausen spoke briefly about the reason behind the change.

"In order to create a more welcoming environment to a diverse community, we are going to forgo saying the Pledge of Allegiance before every meeting," Brausen said. "If there's a special occasion, we will consider using the Pledge of Allegiance before the meeting."

Nagler said he understands the desire to make the meetings more inclusive, but he thinks dropping the pledge is the wrong approach.

"This would be a wonderful opportunity to put copies of the pledge of allegiance in their native languages where they walk in and giving them an opportunity to say it in their native language," Nagler said.

Connect with KSTP


Join the conversation on our social media platforms. Share your comments on our Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter pages.

Credits

Matt Belanger

Copyright 2019 - KSTP-TV, LLC A Hubbard Broadcasting Company

Advertisement

UPDATE: 3 Minnesota National Guard soldiers dead in helicopter crash near St. Cloud

Vehicle fatally strikes pedestrian in northeast St. Paul

Minnesota state leaders react to helicopter crash that killed 3 National Guard soldiers

New study: 25% of Minnesotans will spend more on pets than partners this holiday

Driver charged in fatal Rosemount crash involving 1,100-pound boulder pleads guilty

Advertisement