NATIONAL RESULTS: Democrats on Track for Control of House, GOP Retains Control of Senate

The U.S. Capitol Building in Washington is shrouded in fog early in the morning Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018 on Election Day in the U.S. Photo: AP/ J. David Ake
The U.S. Capitol Building in Washington is shrouded in fog early in the morning Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018 on Election Day in the U.S.

November 06, 2018 11:36 PM

U.S. SENATE UPDATES

11:40 p.m.

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Democratic Sen. Maria Cantwell has won re-election in Washington, beating Republican challenger Susan Hutchison.

Cantwell easily outdistanced Hutchison, a former Seattle TV anchor and state GOP chairwoman.

Cantwell is a former tech executive who previously served one term in the U.S. House and six years as a state representative in the state Legislature. She will be serving her fourth term.

It's been nearly a quarter century since the GOP has captured a major statewide race in Washington.

The last time voters sent a Republican to the U.S. Senate was 1994, when Sen. Slade Gorton was re-elected to his final term before being ousted by Cantwell in 2000.

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11:25 p.m.

Democrat Debbie Stabenow of Michigan has won a fourth term in the Senate, defeating Republican challenger John James.

Stabenow campaigned as a pragmatic lawmaker who forges bipartisan agreement despite the partisan rancor in Washington. She cited her work shaping farm legislation and pushing a new law that allows pharmacists to tell consumers when they can save on prescriptions by paying cash instead of using insurance.

The 68-year-old Stabenow criticized President Trump's attempt to slash federal funding for the Great Lakes. She said James would have been an unabashed enthusiast of Trump with no governing experience.

James is a black combat veteran and business executive. Trump won Michigan in 2016. He called James "a star" candidate.

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11:15 p.m.

Mississippi's U.S. Senate special election is headed to a runoff, and the state's voters will either elect a woman to the office for the first time ever or a black man for the first time since Reconstruction.

Republican Cindy Hyde-Smith and Democrat Mike Espy advanced Tuesday from a field of four. They compete in a Nov. 27 runoff, and the winner will serve the final two years of a term started by Republican Sen. Thad Cochran, who retired in April.

Republican Gov. Phil Bryant appointed Hyde-Smith, who was state agriculture commissioner, to temporarily succeed Cochran until the special election is decided. She is the first woman to represent Mississippi in Congress, but no woman has been elected to the job from the state. She is endorsed by President Donald Trump.

Espy is a former congressman and former U.S. agriculture secretary.

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11:10 p.m.

Democratic Sen. Mazie Hirono of Hawaii has defeated Republican Ron Curtis to win a second term.

Hirono had an advantage going into Tuesday's midterm election as an incumbent with broad name recognition. Her challenger is a retired engineer who had never run for public office.

Hirono has served in the legislature, as lieutenant governor and as U.S. representative. The 71-year-old kept a relatively low profile early on in the Senate, but has gained attention for her outspoken opposition to President Donald Trump and his policies.

Hirono urged men to "shut up and step up" when the Senate was considering confirming Justice Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Some Hawaii voters cheered the statement, while others accused her of being anti-male.

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11:10 p.m.

Democratic Sen. Tina Smith has won Minnesota's special election to finish the final two years of former Sen. Al Franken's term.

Smith defeated Republican state Sen. Karin Housley on Tuesday. The election was a 10-month sprint, triggered in January after Franken resigned amid a growing sexual misconduct scandal.

Smith got a head start in the race when she was appointed to take the seat by Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton. Smith was Dayton's lieutenant governor and former top aide.

Housley tried to brand Smith as a political insider. But national Republican groups largely bypassed Housley's race, sinking resources instead into more winnable races in states like North Dakota and Indiana.

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11:10 p.m.

Republican Sen. Deb Fischer has cruised to a second term in Nebraska, defeating Lincoln city councilwoman Jane Raybould.

Fischer won Tuesday despite Raybould's efforts to cast the first-term incumbent as a Washington insider who sided with her party even when it was harmful to the GOP-friendly state. Raybould pitched herself to voters as an outsider who would look for ways to lower health care costs.

Fischer rejected the criticism and noted her work on Senate committees focused on agriculture and the military, both important areas to Nebraska with its farm economy and Offutt Air Force Base.

The candidates differed on their support for new U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who faced sexual assault allegations during his confirmation process. Kavanaugh denied the allegations. Fischer voted to confirm Kavanaugh, while Raybould said the allegations merited further investigation.

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11 p.m.

Republican Marsha Blackburn has won a grueling, expensive contest to become the first female U.S. senator from Tennessee.

The congresswoman defeated Democratic former Gov. Phil Bredesen on Tuesday by closely aligning her bid with President Donald Trump. The president made three visits to the state for her.

Blackburn has sought to undermine Bredesen's reputation as an independent thinker by tying him to national Democrats at every turn. Blackburn was first elected to the House in 2002 and has called herself a "hardcore, card-carrying Tennessee conservative."

Blackburn will replace retiring Republican Sen. Bob Corker. She represents a rightward shift from Corker and other more centrist senators that Tennessee has historically elected.

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10:50 p.m.

Republicans have retained Senate control for two more years, shattering Democrats' dreams of an anti-Trump wave sweeping them into the majority.

The result was all but assured when Republican Kevin Cramer ousted North Dakota Democratic Sen. Heidi Heitkamp and when Republican businessman Mike Braun ousted Sen. Joe Donnelly in Indiana.

Meanwhile, Sen. Ted Cruz fended off a spirited challenge from Democratic Rep. Beto O'Rourke and Republican Sen. Marsha Blackburn triumphed in Tennessee.

The GOP's gains come even as the results in Nevada and Arizona have yet to be determined.

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10:45 p.m.

Former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has handily won a U.S. Senate seat in his adopted home state of Utah after a campaign where he backed off his once-fierce criticism of Donald Trump.

Romney clinched the win Tuesday as he defeated Democrat Jenny Wilson, a member of the Salt Lake County council.

Romney was the heavy favorite to win the seat in conservative Utah, where he holds near-celebrity status as the first Mormon presidential nominee from a major party.

He replaces longtime Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch, who chose not to seek re-election.

Romney denounced Trump as a "fraud" and a "phony" during the 2016 campaign, but has since said he approves of many Trump policies.

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9:15 p.m.

Republican U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker has been re-elected in Mississippi and Republican John Barrasso has won a second full term in Wyoming.

Wicker defeated Democratic state Rep. David Baria and two others Tuesday, keeping the seat he has held since 2007.

After Republican Sen. Trent Lott resigned in late 2007, then-Gov. Haley Barbour appointed Wicker to temporarily fill the seat. Wicker won a special election in 2008 to complete Lott's term, and was re-elected in 2012.

Barrasso defeated Gary Trauner in a race that was a referendum on President Donald Trump in the state. Barrasso argued that less federal regulation and federal income tax cuts enacted under Trump have helped Wyoming's economy.

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9:05 p.m.

Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand of New York has defeated Republican challenger Chele Farley to win re-election to the U.S. Senate.

Gillibrand was heavily favored in Tuesday's election and has been talked about as a potential presidential candidate in 2020.

At a recent debate, Gillibrand pledged to serve her entire six-year Senate term.

Gillibrand was appointed in 2009 to the Senate seat vacated when Hillary Clinton was nominated as secretary of state.

She rose to prominence in the #MeToo movement last year as the first Democratic senator to call publicly for fellow Democratic Sen. Al Franken to resign amid sexual misconduct allegations.

She has also focused on sexual assault in the military and on college campuses.

Farley works in the financial services industry. She's never held elected office.

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8:55 p.m.

New Jersey Democratic Sen. Bob Menendez has fended off his wealthy Republican challenger to win re-election despite a barrage of ads about corruption charges he beat in court.

Menendez, 64, wins a third term Tuesday after a grueling campaign against Republican Bob Hugin.

Polls showed Hugin, 64, and Menendez much closer than expected in overwhelmingly Democratic New Jersey.

Hugin tapped his deep pockets for at least $27.5 million and spent on TV ads attacking Menendez over the 2017 trial on charges that he helped a friend with Medicare billing in exchange for lavish gifts.

Prosecutors decided not to retry the case after a mistrial.

The race was particularly significant because Democrats are defending 26 seats, including 10 incumbents running in states that President Donald Trump won in 2016.

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8:15 p.m.

Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown has been elected to a third term.

Brown handily defeated fourth-term Rep. Jim Renacci (ruh-NAY'-see), who dropped a governor's bid to run for Senate at Trump's urging.

Brown is in his fifth decade of Ohio politics. He won his first election to the state's House in 1974 and unseated Republican Sen. Mike DeWine in 2006. With a history of blue-collar appeal and union support, Brown has backed Trump moves on steel tariffs and renegotiating trade agreements.

Renacci is a businessman who called Brown a liberal out of touch with Ohio values.

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8 p.m.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, a potential 2020 White House contender, is among a group of five Democratic lawmakers who have easily won re-election to the Senate.

Sens. Chris Murphy of Connecticut, Ben Cardin of Maryland, Tom Carper of Delaware and Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island also won. They were heavy favorites in their races.

Warren has generated considerable speculation about a possible run for the White House in 2020, recently saying she'd take a "hard look" at a presidential bid after the Senate race was over.

Murphy won a second term after amassing a fundraising war chest that was 100 times larger than his opponent's.

Meanwhile, Carper won his fourth term. He has never lost an election during four decades in politics.

Cardin and Whitehouse both won third terms.

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7:55 p.m.

Virginia Democrat Tim Kaine has dispatched a die-hard supporter of President Donald Trump to win re-election to the U.S. Senate.

Kaine defeated Republican Corey Stewart on Tuesday.

The victory was widely expected as Kaine enjoyed large leads in most public polls and had a huge cash advantage.

Kaine is a former governor who was first elected to the Senate in 2012. He was Hillary Clinton's running mate in 2016.

Stewart is a conservative provocateur best known for his outspoken support of Confederate imagery and hard-line views on immigration. He struggled to raise money and was ignored by national GOP groups.

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U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES UPDATES

12:15 a.m.

Democrats have picked up at least 23 House seats, putting them on track to reach the 218 needed to seize control from Republicans after eight years.

Democrats knocked off at least 17 GOP incumbents, picking up moderate, suburban districts across the county. Democrats won seats stretching from suburban Washington, New York and Philadelphia to outside Miami, Chicago and Denver. West Coast results were still coming in.

Democrat Abigail Spanberger of Virginia defeated Republican incumbent Dave Brat in suburban Richmond to put Democrats over the top.

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi is hailing "'a new day in America."

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11:55 p.m.

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi is telling Democratic lawmakers and supporters that elections are about the future and "thank you all for making the future better for all of America's children."

Pelosi spoke as Democrats closed in on control of the House.

Pelosi said the election Tuesday was about more than Republicans and Democrats. It was about restoring the Constitution and providing a balance to the Trump administration.

She says the election is also about stopping what she described as the GOP's attacks on entitlement programs and the Affordable Care Act. She says Democrats will find common ground when they can and stand their ground when necessary.

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11:50 p.m.

Democrats are moving toward control of the House. They've picked up moderate, suburban districts across the Northeast and Midwest as they get closer to the 23 seats they need to wrest control from Republicans.

Republican incumbent Reps. Rod Blum and David Young of Iowa, Randy Hultgren of Illinois, Leonard Lance of New Jersey and Pete Sessions of Texas all lost contested races.

Democrat Abby Finkenauer beat Blum and will be among the youngest women ever elected to the House. Democrat Cindy Axne beat Young, and Lauren Underwood, a 32-year-old African-American nurse, topped Hultgren.

Democrat Tom Malinowski, a former State Department official under President Barack Obama, defeated Lance, a five-term incumbent. Former NFL linebacker and civil rights attorney Colin Allred defeated Sessions, flipping a reliably conservative Dallas enclave.

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11 p.m.

Democrat Sean Casten has defeated six-term Republican Rep. Peter Roskam to flip a suburban Chicago district the GOP has held for more than four decades.

Casten, a scientist and businessman, argued that Roskam was too conservative for a district that supported Hillary Clinton over President Donald Trump in 2016. Casten pointed to Roskam's record of opposing abortion and his record of voting along with Trump.

Casten focused his campaign on health care and has called for stricter gun control laws.

Roskam insisted he's a moderate who opposed Trump when necessary. He criticized Casten as wanting to raise taxes and for name-calling and "embracing the politics of ridicule."

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10:35 p.m.

First-time Democratic candidate Jason Crow has defeated five-term Republican Rep. Mike Coffman in suburban Denver.

Crow, 39, is a former Army Ranger and captain who fought in Iraq. He then went to work at a politically-connected Denver law firm before taking on Coffman, who has survived repeated strong Democratic challenges in the diverse district.

Hillary Clinton won the district by nine points in 2016 while Coffman won it by eight.

Coffman is an Army and Marine veteran and is active on veterans' issues. But Crow used his own military service to neutralize Coffman's advantage. Crow also embraced the cause of gun control in a district that was home to the 2012 Aurora theater shooting that killed 12 and abuts Columbine High School, where two teen-aged gunmen killed 13 in 1999.

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10:25 p.m.

Democrats are gaining ground in their fight for control of the House, picking up key seats in Florida, Pennsylvania and Minnesota.

The early wins give Democrats a share of the seats they'll need for House control. They won two seats in Florida, knocking off two incumbents there, and have won three seats in Pennsylvania, where court-ordered redistricting made the terrain more favorable to Democrats. They have also defeated a Republican incumbent in Minnesota.

Democrats need a net gain of 23 seats to win the House.

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10:10 p.m.

Democratic businessman Dean Phillips has defeated Republican Rep. Erik Paulsen in a suburban Minnesota district that figures heavily into Democrats' hopes for a House takeover.

Paulsen had easily won elections throughout his five terms in office even as the Minneapolis-area district trended toward Democrats.

But the district favored Hillary Clinton by nearly 10 points two years ago, and a statewide poll late in the race showed Phillips with a comfortable lead. Outside groups poured more than $10 million into the battleground race.

Phillips ran his family's liquor company and started a chain of local coffee shops. He painted Paulsen as too in-step with President Donald Trump, though Paulsen tried to distance himself from the president.

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10:05 p.m.

Newly minted Democratic Rep. Conor Lamb of Pennsylvania has defeated three-term Republican Rep. Keith Rothfus in the nation's only House race pitting two incumbents against each other.

Democrats enjoy a 71,000-voter registration edge in the suburban Pittsburgh district, and Lamb comfortably led polls over Rothfus, who has one of Pennsylvania's most conservative voting records in Congress.

Lamb won a special election in March to succeed Republican Rep. Tim Murphy, who resigned, in a district that Trump won by about 20 points.

Both men live in the new 17th District, despite living in different districts that they currently represent.

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10 p.m.

Democrat Debbie Mucarsel-Powell has defeated Republican Rep. Carlos Curbelo in Florida, the second GOP incumbent House member to fall. Curbelo, a moderate and critic of President Donald Trump, was trying to defy the political winds against Trump in the South Florida district.

Mucarsel-Powell is an immigrant from Ecuador who has worked for several nonprofit organizations in Miami-Dade County. She ran on preventing gun violence and protecting the environment, but her main focus was on health care and the Affordable Care Act, which Curbelo voted to repeal.

Mucarsel-Powell painted Curbelo as a politician who talks like a moderate but tends to vote with conservatives.

Curbelo is a leader of the bipartisan Climate Caucus and bucked GOP leadership this summer by supporting a tax on emissions of carbon dioxide, a contributor to global warming.

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9:20 p.m.

Democrat Ayanna Pressley has completed her quest to become Massachusetts' first black woman elected to Congress.

Pressley is also the first African-American to serve on the Boston City Council. She sailed through Tuesday's general election to Congress unopposed, two months after unseating 10-term Rep. Michael Capuano in a primary that was a national political stunner.

With no Republican in the race in the heavily Democratic district, her upset victory in the primary had all but assured Pressley the House seat, with only the remote possibility of a write-in campaign to potentially stop her.

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9:00 p.m.

Republican Rep. Andy Barr of Kentucky won a close-fought race that Democrats had targeted in a bid to shift the House to Democratic control.

Barr turned back a strong challenge from Democrat Amy McGrath in a district that supported President Donald Trump two years ago.

McGrath, a retired fighter pilot, gave Barr his toughest test yet as he sought a fourth term. Barr urged voters to re-elect him for his "access and influence with this administration," while McGrath countered with a message of "country over party."

Barr won by 22 points in 2016, but McGrath waged an aggressive challenge, including TV ads showing her in front of fighter jets and with her young children.

The district includes Lexington and capital Frankfort. The seat has switched parties five times since 1978.

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8:50 p.m.

In Indiana, Greg Pence, an older brother of Vice President Mike Pence, has won a heavily Republican House seat that his famous sibling once held.

The 61-year-old Pence, an owner of two antique malls, defeated Democrat Jeannine Lee Lake, who publishes a bi-monthly Muncie newspaper.

The eastern Indiana seat is open because Republican Rep. Luke Messer ran in the GOP primary for the Senate. Greg Pence is one of Mike Pence's three brothers.

Greg Pence is a Marine veteran and once ran a now-bankrupt chain of convenience stores.

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8:30 p.m.

Republican Rep. Barbara Comstock of Virginia was the first congressional incumbent to lose as voters in her Northern Virginia district expressed their continued dislike of President Donald Trump.

Democratic state Sen. Jennifer Wexton won an easy victory in the wealthy suburban district outside Washington, which Hillary Clinton won by 10 percentage points.

Comstock tried hard to emphasize her independence from Trump, but Wexton, a former prosecutor, portrayed the two-term incumbent as a Trump ally out of touch with the diverse, well-educated district.

Comstock easily beat a Democrat in 2016 when her district went for Clinton.

The national focus on the race helped Comstock and Wexton raise more than $5 million in all, while outside groups spent more than $10 million.

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8:25 p.m.

Donna Shalala has won a U.S. House seat in Florida, making her the first Democrat to flip a GOP seat on Tuesday night.

After serving in President Bill Clinton's Cabinet and running major universities, Shalala is starting a third career with her election to the House.

The 77-year-old Democrat won Tuesday in a Miami district that had long been in Republican hands. Shalala has sought to turn her age into a positive by stressing her experience with this slogan: "Ready on Day One."

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8:10 p.m.

Polls have closed across the East Coast, but the results in some of the most closely watched races remain too close to call.

Polls across six states closed at 7 p.m. EST, including battlegrounds Georgia, Indiana and Kentucky. Polls in other key states including Florida, Pennsylvania and New Jersey closed at 8 p.m. EST.

At least two lower-profile elections with presidential implications were decided after the first major wave of polls closed in the East.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders easily won his third term as he considers another bid for the Democratic presidential nomination. And Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, another potential 2020 contender, also won her race.

Health care and immigration were high on voters' minds as they cast ballots in the midterm elections, per a wide-ranging survey by The Associated Press.

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7:55 p.m.

Virginia Democrat Tim Kaine has dispatched a die-hard supporter of President Donald Trump to win re-election to the U.S. Senate.

Kaine defeated Republican Corey Stewart on Tuesday.

The victory was widely expected as Kaine enjoyed large leads in most public polls and had a huge cash advantage.

Kaine is a former governor who was first elected to the Senate in 2012. He was Hillary Clinton's running mate in 2016.

Stewart is a conservative provocateur best known for his outspoken support of Confederate imagery and hard-line views on immigration. He struggled to raise money and was ignored by national GOP groups.

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7:15 p.m.

As polls begin to close, the White House is stressing the effort President Donald Trump put into a political ground game aimed at putting Republicans in the win column for Tuesday's midterm elections.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders says in a written statement that Trump has headlined 50 political rallies, 30 in the past two months. He's campaigned for dozens of candidates at all levels of government.

Sanders says the Republican National Committee raised more than $250 million under Trump to defy what she calls "midterm history," which tends to favor the party that does not control the White House.

Sanders says the president and first lady Melania Trump are looking forward to watching election results Tuesday night with friends and family in the White House residence.

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7:00 p.m.

Vermont's Bernie Sanders has cruised to re-election for his third term in the Senate, easily outpacing eight candidates.

Sanders, the independent who has long been one of the state's most popular politicians, spent little time campaigning ahead of Tuesday's election.

Sanders has faced few serious opponents since he was first elected to the state's lone seat in the House in 1990. He moved up to the Senate in 2006.

The Republican candidate, Lawrence Zupan, a Manchester real estate broker with experience in international trade, campaigned against what he felt was big government and social welfare programs. But his candidacy never gained traction and his campaign drew little attention.

Rather than focusing on his re-election, Sanders traveled the country to support Democratic candidates and an array of policy issues.


GUBERNATORIAL UPDATES

11:50 p.m.

There will be no change at the top in Vermont or Oregon.

Republican Gov. Phil Scott won re-election Tuesday in the traditionally Democratic state of Vermont by defeating Democratic challenger Christine Hallquist.

In Oregon, Democratic Gov. Kate Brown won re-election over Republican challenger Knute Buehler.

Republicans had believed that Oregon provided one of their best chances to flip a Democratic governor's seat in a year when Democrats generally have been making greater gains.

Democrats on Tuesday flipped governor's offices in at least four states — Illinois, Kansas, Michigan and New Mexico.

Republicans entered Election Day holding 33 governor's offices and two-thirds of the state legislative chambers.

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11:40 p.m.

Democrat Laura Kelly has defeated a prominent ally of President Donald Trump to win the Kansas governor's race.

Kelly defeated Republican Secretary of State Kris Kobach (KOH'-bahk) on Tuesday to flip the governor's office from red to blue.

It was at least the fourth Democratic pickup, along with wins in the Illinois, Michigan and New Mexico governors' races.

Kobach had built a national profile as an advocate of tough immigration policies and strict voter photo ID laws. He served as vice chairman of Trump's now-defunct commission on voter fraud.

Kelly will be Kansas' third governor in a year.

Republican Gov. Sam Brownback resigned in January to accept a position in Trump's administration. He was succeeded by Lt. Gov. Jeff Colyer, whom Kobach defeated in the Republican gubernatorial primary.

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11:35 p.m.

Republicans have turned back Democratic challengers to keep control of the governors' offices in Arizona, New Hampshire and Ohio.

In Ohio, Republican Attorney General Mike DeWine defeated Democrat Richard Cordray on Tuesday to lead a GOP sweep of nonjudicial statewide offices. DeWine will succeed term-limited Republican Gov. John Kasich (KAY'-sihk).

Cordray had been an Obama-era consumer protection chief.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey defeated Democratic education professor David Garcia to win re-election in a race that focused on border security and education.

New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu (soo-NOO'-noo) won another two-year term by defeating former Democrat state Sen. Molly Kelly.

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11:30 p.m.

Republican Ron DeSantis will be Florida's next governor, riding President Donald Trump's support to a victory over Democrat Andrew Gillum.

The 40-year-old former congressman and Navy officer won Tuesday after Trump went to Florida twice in the final six days of the election to help increase Republican turnout.

Gillum was hoping to become Florida's first black governor. He conceded late Tuesday.

DeSantis was considered an underdog until Trump injected himself in the Republican primary, helping DeSantis cruise to victory over better-funded and better-known Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam.

DeSantis stumbled after his nomination, most notably by saying Floridians shouldn't "monkey this up" be electing Gillum. Although he took a more moderate turn after the primary, he relied heavily on Trump in the last days of the election.

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11:25 p.m.

Florida Democratic nominee for governor Andrew Gillum is conceding to his Republican rival, Ron DeSantis.

The Tallahassee mayor was seeking to become the state's first black governor and become the first Democrat to win the governor's race in more than 20 years.

The Associated Press has not called the race.  

DeSantis was supported in the race by President Donald Trump.

Gillum told a crowd gathered on the campus of Florida A&M University on Tuesday he sincerely regrets he "couldn't bring it home for you."

Gillum pulled off an upset when he won the Democratic primary in August.

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11:10 p.m.

Democrats have held on to governors' offices in Minnesota and Hawaii.

Minnesota Rep. Tim Walz defeated Republican Jeff Johnson on Tuesday to mark the first time since the 1950s that one of Minnesota's political parties has held on to the office for at least three terms. He will replace Gov. Mark Dayton, who chose not to seek re-election.

In Hawaii, Gov. David Ige (EE'-gay) won re-election by defeating Republican state Rep. Andria Tupola. Hawaii is a heavily Democratic state.

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11:05 p.m.

Democrats are chipping away at Republican leadership in state capitols by flipping control of at least three gubernatorial offices.

Democrats J.B. Pritzker in Illinois, Gretchen Whitmer in Michigan and Michelle Lujan Grisham in New Mexico won elections Tuesday for seats previously held by Republicans.

Democratic gubernatorial candidates also were putting up strong challenges in the previously Republican-held states of Iowa, Kansas, Wisconsin and South Dakota.

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