Minnesota State Patrol recruiting more women

December 15, 2018 06:42 PM

The Minnesota State Patrol hopes more women will choose to wear the uniform.

The agency held its annual Women in Law Enforcement Information Session in Golden Valley Saturday.

Advertisement

Lt. Col. Rochelle Schrofer wasn't always with the Minnesota State Patrol. After working in the information technology field, she joined the agency in 1998.

"At the time, there was not as many female troopers as there are, but there were some that had blazed the trail in front of myself already," said Schrofer.


More from KSTP


Five years ago, the State Patrol started the annual event in order to recruit more women.

"We made a decision just to be really frank of the fact that we need diversity in our ranks, and we are trying to recruit diversity and particularly women," said Schrofer.

Right now, only 10 percent of Minnesota state troopers are women. There are currently 54 female troopers keeping the roads safe.

Matison Schoeder is a senior court clerk in Ramsey County. She came to Saturday's session with an interest in law enforcement.

"Kind of how the whole hiring process works, background process, and basically what I would need to do to prepare myself to get ready for the LETO program," said Schoeder.

Schrofer said joining the Minnesota State Patrol was the best decision she has made.

"What I love about this organization is that females are very welcome in our organization and the opportunities exist equitably across the board."

Connect with KSTP


Join the conversation on our social media platforms. Share your comments on our Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter pages.

Credits

Ashley Zilka

Copyright 2018 - KSTP-TV, LLC A Hubbard Broadcasting Company

Advertisement

Scott County leaders assess flooding damage at Valley Green Park

Sunny sky, warm weather expected Saturday

Mueller concludes Russia-Trump probe; no new indictments

Police: Body discovered in Roseville

Flooding impact continues to be felt across Minnesota

Scooters coming back to the Twin Cities, but with more regulation

Advertisement