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Minneapolis Police Announce Changes to Body Camera Policy

March 26, 2019 09:26 AM

The Minneapolis Police Department announced Wednesday it has made significant changes to its body-worn camera policy, including new disciplinary procedures for officers who run afoul of the regulations.

During a press conference Wednesday, Mayor Jacob Frey said the changes are designed to maximize the number of times cameras are activated during calls for service, and "gives teeth" to the policy by putting in "clear disciplinary measures" when a policy is violated.

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RELATED: Police Not Tracking Body Camera Use Per Council Directive

Frey pointed out several specifics in the new policy, including that officers are required to activate their body-worn cameras when they are two city blocks from the dispatched call.

If the officer is closer than two city blocks, they are required to activate the camera immediately after being notified by dispatch.

The policy also lays out when officers are allowed to deactivate the cameras at the scene of critical incidents and during other calls for service.

"Bottom line is that this body-worn camera policy is stronger,' Frey said. "It's implementation will bring more accountability for law enforcement."

Police chief Medaria Arradondo said officers who fail to activate their cameras, or deactivate when they are not supposed to, will be subject to new disciplinary measures, measures he said leadership is "taking seriously."

RELATED: City Council Notebook: MPD Body Cam Report, NARCAN Pilot Project and More

"We have to ensure that they are using it properly," Arradondo said. "This is an important tool that is not going away.

To read the full policy, click here.



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