American Meteor Society: 14 reports of a meteor in Minnesota Thursday morning

December 21, 2018 05:41 PM

Video of a mystery flash over the Twin Cities metro area early Thursday morning has been lighting up social media.

And experts with the American Meteor Society now confirm the flash that some Minnesotans saw was a meteor.

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It happened just after 2 a.m. 

"The sky gets a little brighter, then all of a sudden there's a flash and it's gone," said Jeff Baker, with Baker Insurance Brokers and who lives in Oak Grove.

RELATED: Was there a meteor sighting in the Twin Cities metro overnight?

Baker said he installed a new gadget at the front door of his home on Wednesday. 

"We just wanted to kind of keep an eye on things," he said. 

But when he woke up Thursday morning, he and his wife noticed some activity captured by their Nest doorbell in the middle of the night.

"My wife showed it to me this morning, and I was like we must have had lightning or something, and I just blew it off," Baker said. 

But hearing of similar videos assured them that what they were looking at was real. 

"It's unbelievable," Baker said. 

The American Meteor Society received 14 reports of fireballs in the sky in Minnesota on Thursday morning - stretching from Prior Lake to near Mora. 

Along with the flash came with a loud boom.

Diedre Zelin of Bethel said she was in her kitchen when she heard it just after 2 a.m. Thursday.

"It sounded like an explosion or a car crash outside the house," she said. "It shook the whole house. It rattled the floors and windows. It was really loud."

Initially, Zelin feared it was something inside her house.

"I thought my furnace blew up," she said. "I was in the kitchen, and it shook the floor and the window. My furnace is underneath. So I thought it might have been my furnace or hot water heater. It was kind of scary."

Experts with the American Meteor Society told the Star Tribune that the fireball, estimated to be the size of a refrigerator, may have dropped rocks as big as a grape.

Baker said it's fun to be one of the few who can say they have home video of a meteor. 

"This is my 15 minutes of fame," Baker said. 

The American Meteor Society believes this is only the second time all year that a meteor was close enough to drop rocks. 

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Brett Hoffland

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