When furnaces are working overtime, emergencies can happen

January 24, 2019 11:00 PM

The coming cold weather is not the time to have heating problems at your home or work place. 

But such problems do occur.

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One heating crew Thursday said they get roughly 20 to 30 emergency calls per day when the weather turns as cold as it is forecast to get over the next week.

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The reason? Furnaces are working overtime.

They are running for longer periods trying to keep up, pumping warm air into homes.

And all that use can wear down certain parts.

"Just like a car with maintenance repairs, like brake pads or spark plugs, there are components in furnaces that are expected to get replaced throughout the life of it," said Ian Werner with Hero Plymbing Heating and Cooling.

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Werner said the filter is one of the most important pieces to a furnace. It's responsible for about half of their late night emergency calls, and one of the easiest things to maintain.

"Before the temperature gets too cold, or really drops, you want to make sure you have a clean filter going into that cold snap," he said. "Because again, it's going to be running a lot in that period of time, and filters are going to get plugged up."

Most filters can last up to 90 days. But in this cold weather, when a furnace is working harder, the filter will likely need to be replaced sooner.

Werner said one of the best ways to avoid an emergency call is to do preventative maintanance early in the season.
 

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Credits

Jessica Miles

Copyright 2019 - KSTP-TV, LLC A Hubbard Broadcasting Company

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