Dayton Signs Bill Aimed at Protecting Children From Identity Theft

May 21, 2018 02:20 PM

The investigation above aired in 2017.


Gov. Mark Dayton signed a bill over the weekend allowing parents or guardians the ability to place a credit security freeze on their child’s name to protect them from possible financial identity theft.

Rep. John Petersburg, R-Waseca, authored H.F. 1243, which allows parents or guardians to place a credit freeze at the three major credit bureaus on a child under the age of 16, so their personal information can’t be released to open an account or extension of credit.

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There is no cost for taking that action.

“We know that identity theft is a growing concern,” Petersburg said. “This is an important bill because it gives parents the oversight over their children and to protect them.”

5 EYEWITNESS NEWS has been tracking the bill since the winter of 2017 when the special series "In The Wrong Hands: Child ID Theft" ran, providing parents, grandparents and guardians with answers on how to protect a child from identity theft.

Investigative: In the Wrong Hands: Child ID Theft

Petersburg said the new law will catch Minnesota up to 27 other states that now allow parents to place a credit freeze in their child’s name.

That group includes Wisconsin.

If a child is already the victim of identity theft, the Minnesota bill requires the credit bureaus place a freeze on their account within three calendar days - instead of the currently required 10 days, according to Petersburg.

The legislation also allows adult Minnesotans the ability to freeze their credit reports at the major credit reporting bureaus for free.

The law goes into effect on Jan. 1 of next year.

KSTP Investigative Page

Credits

Eric Chaloux

Copyright 2018 - KSTP-TV, LLC A Hubbard Broadcasting Company

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