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Judge: Massacre suspect's attorneys can't summon counselors

Parkland school shooting suspect Nikolas Cruz in court at the Broward Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Tuesday, May 1, 2019 for motion by the Public Defender's Office to withdraw from the case due to Cruz receiving an inheritance that can be used to pay for a private attorney. Defense attorney Melisa McNeill and Diane Cuddihy speak with their client. Nikolas Cruz, who faces the death penalty if convicted. Cruz is accused of killing 17 and wounding 17 in the February 2018 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. Photo: Mike Stocker/ South Florida Sun-Sentinal via AP
Parkland school shooting suspect Nikolas Cruz in court at the Broward Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Tuesday, May 1, 2019 for motion by the Public Defender's Office to withdraw from the case due to Cruz receiving an inheritance that can be used to pay for a private attorney. Defense attorney Melisa McNeill and Diane Cuddihy speak with their client. Nikolas Cruz, who faces the death penalty if convicted. Cruz is accused of killing 17 and wounding 17 in the February 2018 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.

May 02, 2019 04:01 PM

 Attorneys for the former student charged with last year's Florida high school massacre won't get to secretly subpoena his former mental health counselors.

Judge Elizabeth Scherer in an order posted Thursday ruled Nikolas Cruz's public defenders under Florida law can't force counselors who treated him before the shooting to be interviewed without notifying prosecutors and allowing their attendance.

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Associated Press

(Copyright 2019 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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