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Al Asad attack: 11 US service members have been transferred out of Iraq for medical care

This aerial photo taken from a helicopter shows Ain al-Asad air base in the western Anbar desert, Iraq, Sunday, Dec. 29, 2019. An Iraqi general said Sunday that security has been beefed up around the Ain al-Asad air base, a sprawling complex that hosts U.S. forces, following a series of attacks. Photo: AP Photo/Nasser Nasser
This aerial photo taken from a helicopter shows Ain al-Asad air base in the western Anbar desert, Iraq, Sunday, Dec. 29, 2019. An Iraqi general said Sunday that security has been beefed up around the Ain al-Asad air base, a sprawling complex that hosts U.S. forces, following a series of attacks.

Updated: January 16, 2020 10:11 PM

Several U.S. military personnel have been transported from the Ain al-Asad Air Base in Iraq with injuries related to a missile strike earlier this month, a Department of Defense official said Thursday.

Iran fired 15 missiles on Jan. 8 at Iraqi bases housing U.S. military personnel, and 10 of those hit Ain al-Asad. Shortly after the attack, Iranian state TV said it was in retaliation for the killing of Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani in a U.S.-ordered airstrike.

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No service members have been killed, but several have been treated for concussion symptoms, Capt. Bill Urban, a spokesman for U.S. Central Command, said in a statement Thursday. All personnel who were nearby missile blasts were screened for traumatic brain injuries as a standard procedure.

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If deemed appropriate, personnel were transported to receive "a higher level of care."

So far, eight service members have been taken to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany and three have been taken to Camp Arifjan in Kuwait, Urban said.

"When deemed fit for duty, the service members are expected to return to Iraq following screening," Urban said. "The health and welfare of our personnel is a top priority."

HIPAA laws prevent individuals' statuses from being disclosed.

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