7.0 magnitude earthquake rocks Anchorage

November 30, 2018 02:25 PM

A 7.0 magnitude earthquake rocked buildings Friday morning in Anchorage and caused lamp posts and trees to sway, prompting people to run out of offices and seek shelter under office desks.

The U.S. Geological Survey says the earthquake was centered about 7 miles north of Alaska's largest city.

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An Associated Press reporter working in downtown Anchorage saw cracks in a 2-story building after the quake. It was unclear whether there were injuries.

People went back inside buildings after the earthquake but a smaller aftershock a short time later sent them running back into the streets again.

Shortly after the quake, a tsunami warning was issued for the southern Alaska coastal areas of Cook's Inlet and part of the Kenai peninsula.

The warning means tsunami waves were expected.

The U.S. Geological Survey initially said it was a 6.7 magnitude earthquake, then reduced the magnitude to 6.6, then boosted it to 7.0.

On March 27, 1964, Alaska was hit by a magnitude 9.2 earthquake, the strongest recorded in U.S. history, centered about 75 miles east of Anchorage. The quake, which lasted about 4½ minutes, and the tsunami it triggered claimed about 130 lives.

This is a breaking news story. KSTP is working to get more details on this story and will post updates as more information becomes available.

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Credits

The Associated Press

(Copyright 2018 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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