Advertisement

Know The Truth Prevention Program aims to stop teens from vaping

In this Tuesday, April 10, 2018 photo, a high school principal displays vaping devices that were confiscated from students at the school in Massachusetts. On Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019, the Vapor Technology Association filed a lawsuit against the U.S. government to delay a review of electronic cigarettes. Photo: AP/Steven Senne
In this Tuesday, April 10, 2018 photo, a high school principal displays vaping devices that were confiscated from students at the school in Massachusetts. On Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019, the Vapor Technology Association filed a lawsuit against the U.S. government to delay a review of electronic cigarettes.

Updated: September 06, 2019 07:13 PM

For the first time, someone in Minnesota has died from a lung injury related to vaping.

Advertisement

The Department of Health said the person was over the age of 65 and had been vaping illegal products. To date, 17 Minnesotans have become sick from vaping and another 15 cases are under investigation. State leaders are urging people of all ages to stop vaping. 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS got a close up look at a new campaign aimed at doing that.

Prior Lake High School freshman Sonnie Trabing said, "it's not good." 

Trabing said she doesn't vape. But for her Generation Z counterparts, "it's common, and it's bad but, it's very very common right now." 

She notes how for many it is difficult to quit the habit.

Health officials confirm first Minnesota death linked to vaping

"I know kids younger than me who vape, I know, there are just so many kids. And it's just not good... and people, they just get addicted so easily," Trabing said.

It can be a gateway drug. Trabing described how teens sometimes think.

"If I can vape then, and nothing's happening to me, then why don't I start cigarettes," Trabing said.

It's exactly what Minnesota Adult and Teen Challenge's 'Know the Truth Prevention Program' wants to stop.

Sadie Holland is the Prevention Education Manager for Know the Truth.

"They're all young in age, we really focus on that peer-to-peer format," she said.

That's where Aubrey Lee steps in.

"We don't want them to make the same decisions that we made."

She is a lead prevention presenter with KTT. At just 21 years old, she's teaching students at Prior Lake High School to say no to vaping.

"Addiction doesn't have boundaries, addiction doesn't discriminate, it can happen to anybody," Lee said.

US health officials report 5th vaping death, repeat warning

This year, Know The Truth is trying something new. They're not only teaching prevention at school districts across the state, but also sharing what can happen if Generation Z teens do vape. They're inhaling formaldehyde and aerosol, and can get lung damage or nicotine poisoning from it.

The organization said more than 40 percent of high school students have reported that they've tried vaping at least once. Also, in anonymous student surveys, the KTT program learned students believe vaping is harmless.

"With a vape, it's so habitual, that it's just in their hand, and so essentially they could be smoking way more than they would be if they were just smoking a traditional cigarette," said Holland.

Holland says the organization is going to schools across the state to get the word out.

"We go in, we have an evidence-based curriculum updating them on maybe any misconceptions that they might have about substance use," she said.

For more information on e-cigarettes, click here.

Connect with KSTP


Join the conversation on our social media platforms. Share your comments on our Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter pages.

Credits

Brandi Powell

Copyright 2019 - KSTP-TV, LLC A Hubbard Broadcasting Company

Advertisement

Fairmont city administrator on leave as outside investigator looks into expiring cases

City of Minneapolis working on continuing neighborhood organizations funding

Cold, wet weather making life tough on Minnesota farmers

Moorhead police ask for public's help locating runaway

Democrats weigh formal impeachment vote as probe quickens

'Minnesota Cold Weather Rule' now in effect

Advertisement