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Camera at U of M may help researchers detect early signs of Alzheimer's

May 15, 2019 08:18 PM

At the University of Minnesota, researchers are using the eyes to see some very important warning signs.

They've invented a camera that's helping detect one sign of Alzheimer's disease earlier than ever.  

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The camera shines a line into the retina, and measures the way the light is reflected. 

The camera detects the Amyloid beta protein. In early onset Alzheimer's patients, this protein uncoils and reflects light differently than a regular scan. By measuring the light levels, researchers can detect one of the first indicators of Alzheimer's before plaque builds up.


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The camera is still being used only for research, but eventually this technology could lead to earlier detection and treatment.

"It will hopefully help develop drugs to treat Alzheimer's because the camera can also be used to follow the progress of a new drug as patients are being treated," U of M inventor Bob Vince said.

There are only five cameras like this one, and they are all being used at different clinical trials around the world - including in Israel, Boston and at the U of M.


 

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Credits

Ellen Galles

Copyright 2019 - KSTP-TV, LLC A Hubbard Broadcasting Company

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