Ford recalls over 953,000 vehicles to replace inflators

This Feb. 15, 2018, file photo shows a Ford logo on the grill of a car on display at the Pittsburgh Auto Show. Photo: AP/Gene J. Puskar, File
This Feb. 15, 2018, file photo shows a Ford logo on the grill of a car on display at the Pittsburgh Auto Show.

January 04, 2019 09:02 AM

Ford is recalling more than 953,000 vehicles worldwide to replace Takata passenger air bag inflators that can explode and hurl shrapnel.

The move includes 782,000 vehicles in the U.S. and is part of the largest series of recalls in U.S. history.

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Included are the 2010 Ford Edge and Lincoln MKX, the 2010 and 2011 Ford Ranger, the 2010 to 2012 Ford Fusion and Lincoln MKZ, the 2010 and 2011 Mercury Milan, and the 2010 to 2014 Ford Mustang.


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Some of the recalls may be limited to specific geographic areas of the U.S.

At least 23 people have been killed worldwide by the inflators.

Ford says it doesn't know of any injuries in vehicles included in this recall. Dealers will replace the inflators.

Takata uses the chemical ammonium nitrate to create an explosion to inflate air bags. But it can deteriorate over time due to heat and humidity and explode with too much force, blowing apart a metal canister designed to contain the explosion.

Takata recalls are being phased in through 2020.

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Credits

The Associated Press

(Copyright 2019 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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