MNLARS Issues Taken Up During Hearing in St. Paul

November 15, 2017 12:31 PM

Those frustrated with the Minnesota Licensing and Registration System rollout will be able to voice their concerns with lawmakers Wednesday.

The state rolled out the $90 million system this summer. Since then, hundreds of people have filed complaints over delays, incorrect charges and receiving the wrong plates.

Advertisement

The meeting Wednesday is expected to draw many people concerned about the amount of time they've spent waiting in lines or on the phone, receiving tabs and title late, or not being able to submit payments.

Recently, dozens of customers in Maple Grove were turned away due to "intermittent problems" with the system.

RELATED: Customers Seeking Vehicle Tabs Turned Away After More MNLARS Glitches

However, Maple Grove residents aren't the only ones experiencing issues. A website set up by the Minnesota House Republicans has taken complaints from Brooklyn Park, Roseville, St. Peter, Woodbury, and others.

Gov. Mark Dayton said while the rollout hasn't been perfect, he insists about 99 percent of transactions are processed smoothly

However, not everyone is convinced, especially those who listened to problems with MNLARS at a committee hearing in September.

RELATED: Unimpressed with Improvements, Lawmakers Pressure Public Safety Department to Fix MNLARS

"Nobody likes to complain, but we have a whole bunch of Minnesota residents that have told us, 'We have a problem,'" Rep. Dave Baker (R-Willmar), said.

A Senate committee is expected to ask the Department of Public Safety why those issues are occurring and what's being done to fix them.

Anyone dealing with MNLARS problems was able to testify at Wednesday's hearing, which began at 10:30 a.m. at the Senate building.

 

 

KSTP

Copyright 2017 - KSTP-TV, LLC A Hubbard Broadcasting Company

Advertisement

Minnesota Senate Appointment Could Spur Legal Fight

Dayton Selects Smith to Fill Franken's Senate Seat

Metropolitan Council Issues Contract Proposal to Drivers

Minneapolis Weighs a Shorter School Year

Minnesota's Next Senator: Quiet Organizer, Late to Politics

Fischbach Expects to Retain Senate Seat Upon Becoming Lt. Governor

Advertisement