Police: Donald Trump Jr.'s Wife Exposed to White Powder

In this Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017, file photo, Donald Trump Jr., far second right, his wife Vanessa Trump, center, and their family, watch performances during the National Christmas Tree lighting ceremony at the Ellipse near the White House in Washington. Photo: AP/Manuel Balce Ceneta
In this Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017, file photo, Donald Trump Jr., far second right, his wife Vanessa Trump, center, and their family, watch performances during the National Christmas Tree lighting ceremony at the Ellipse near the White House in Washington.

February 12, 2018 02:27 PM

Donald Trump Jr.'s wife was taken to a New York City hospital as a precaution Monday after she opened an envelope addressed to her husband that contained an unidentified white powder, police said.

A preliminary test indicated the substance wasn't dangerous, police said.

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Vanessa Trump, 40, opened the letter addressed to the president's son Monday morning at their midtown Manhattan apartment, investigators said. She called 911 and said she was coughing and felt nauseous, police said.

RELATED: Trump Jr. Messaged with WikiLeaks During, After Campaign

The Trump Organization didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

Detectives from the New York Police Department's intelligence division and Secret Service agents were investigating.

"The Secret Service and our law enforcement partners in New York City are investigating a suspicious package addressed to one of our protectees received today in New York, New York. This is an active investigation and we cannot comment any further," Secret Service Special Agent Jeffrey Adams said in a statement.

Vanessa Trump, a former model, and Donald Trump Jr. have five children, none of whom were home at the time of the incident.

RELATED: Donald Trump Jr. Heads to Capitol to Explain 2016 Meeting

In March 2016, police detectives and FBI agents investigated a threatening letter sent to the Manhattan apartment of Donald Trump Jr.'s brother, Eric, that also contained a white powder that turned out to be harmless. Envelopes containing white powder were also sent to Trump Tower, which served as Trump's campaign headquarters, twice in 2016.

Hoax attacks using white powder play on fears that date to 2001, when letters containing deadly anthrax were mailed to news organizations and the offices of two U.S. senators. Those letters killed five people.

RELATED: Trump Jr. Tells Senate He 'Did Not Collude' with Russians

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The Associated Press

(Copyright 2018 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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