State Lawmaker Calls for Legislative Audit of U.S. Bank Stadium Security Company

June 09, 2017 11:30 AM

The chair of the Minnesota House State Government Finance Committee said she wants the Legislative Auditor to conduct a full investigation into the operations of the company hired to manage security for U.S. Bank Stadium.

State Representative, Sarah Anderson, (R) Plymouth, said a KSTP report Wednesday night, which revealed the existence of a current state investigation into Monterrey Security, is the reason she wants the audit.

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Multiple sources told KSTP allegations against Monterrey Security include:  Falsification of government documents required for security training which includes "hundreds of employees," failure to conduct background checks on employees as required by Minnesota law and hiring people with felony criminal convictions without proper security clearance to work at U.S. Bank Stadium games and events.

"I am floored. This goes right to the issue of the fact we have severe security issues that are at stake here," Anderson said.

RELATED: Sources: Major Investigation of Possible Security Issues at US Bank Stadium

Anderson also said the allegations about the possible lack of criminal background checks is especially troubling.

"That's alarming when people are anticipating their security they are certainly expecting that those individuals have had a background check and that they are qualified individuals who've had the training,'' she said.

Kathleen Blatz chairs the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority, which oversees operations at U.S. Bank Stadium. The MSFA approved the contract for Monterrey Security, which started protecting the stadium around the clock on July 1, 2016. According to MSFA records, Monterrey Security has been paid $4.1 million for its security services.

Blatz said she is now in contact with the Minnesota Private Detective and Protective Agent Services Board, which is the state board conducting the investigation into Monterrey Security.

Blatz said she will make sure there are no short-term security problems that need to be addressed before the investigation is finished.

"My first reaction to all of this is that these allegations are very serious, and if proven true, we have a serious problem here," Blatz said.

Credits

Jay Kolls

Copyright 2017 - KSTP-TV, LLC A Hubbard Broadcasting Company

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