Police Departments Install Anti-Ambush Technology in Squads

August 11, 2017 07:18 PM

Several metro police departments are using new technology that will alert officers when someone is approaching their squad cars to protect them from being ambushed.

"It's like a second set of eyes on the back of the car," Golden Valley Police Sgt. Randy Mahlen. “We're trying to stay ahead and provide all our officers with the best technology we can."

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Golden Valley Police, Eagan and Coon Rapids Police Departments are the only departments according to the state, county, and local police agencies surveyed by 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS that use the “Surveillance Mode Module” technology.

With the push of a dash mounted button, an officer can put their patrol vehicle into “surveillance mode” when in park.

RELATED: Source: Cops Thought They Were Caught in Ambush

As a person approaches the squad, it activates the backup camera, which automatically shows the officer some is getting close to the car. Once activated, it sets off an alarm, flashing lights, locks the vehicle doors and rolls the windows.

Back in June, a New York City police officer was fatally shot while in her squad car. Last fall, two Des Moines area police officers will killed on duty.

Four police officers have been killed this year in ambushes, while 21 lost their lives while on duty, according to the National Law Enforcement Memorial Fund.

"If you look across the country over the last several years, the number of ambushes on law enforcement has increased dramatically,” Sgt. Mahlen said. “This is another tool we can use to stay ahead of criminals."

The technology cost the City of Golden Valley $696 per unit.

The company that makes the module, California-based InterMotive, produces version for Ford, Dodge and GM police vehicles.

Credits

Eric Chaloux

Copyright 2017 - KSTP-TV, LLC A Hubbard Broadcasting Company

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