Supreme Court to Take Up Minnesota Statute On Polling Place Attire

In this Tuesday, April 4, 2017 file photo, the Supreme Court Building is seen in Washington. Photo: AP/ J. Scott Applewhite
In this Tuesday, April 4, 2017 file photo, the Supreme Court Building is seen in Washington.

November 13, 2017 11:37 AM

The Supreme Court has agreed to determine whether a Minnesota statute that prohibits wearing political apparel in polling places is unconstitutional.

The Supreme Court said Monday it will take a case challenging the law. Several groups sued just before the 2010 election to try to ensure officials would not bar them from wearing tea party apparel to the polls, including buttons that read, "Please I.D. Me." They referred to legislation that would have required voters to show identification at the polls.

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Minnesota voters in 2012 rejected a state constitutional amendment that would have required voters to show photo identification before voting.

Lower courts upheld Minnesota's law barring political apparel at voting places, saying it's reasonable and applies equally to all political material regardless of viewpoint.

Credits

Associated Press

(Copyright 2017 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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