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Target's Chairman and CEO Out in Wake of Data Breach

Updated: 05/05/2014 10:42 PM
Created: 05/05/2014 7:03 AM KSTP.com

Target's Chairman and CEO has stepped down.
    
Target announced Monday that Chairman, President and CEO Gregg Steinhafel is out nearly five months after the retailer disclosed a breach of customer data, which has hurt its reputation among customers and hammered its business.
    
Experts say his departure marks the first CEO of a major corporation to resign in the wake of a data breach and underscores how CEOS are now becoming more at risk in an era when such breaches have become common.

"In the retail business, every day is about trust.  If customers don't feel comfortable shopping at your store, it impacts your business," said Josh Hill, a senior portfolio manager at the Minneapolis-based Windsor Financial Group, a longtime Target stock holder.
    
The nation's third-largest retailer said Steinhafel, a 35-year veteran of the company and CEO since 2008, has agreed to step down, effective immediately. He also resigned from the board of directors.
    
The departure suggests the company is trying to start with a clean slate as it wrestles with the fallout from hackers' theft of credit and debit card information on tens of millions of customers. The company's sales, profit and stock price have all suffered since the breach was disclosed.
    
A company spokeswoman declined to give specifics on when the decision was reached. But in a statement issued Monday, the board said that that after extensive discussions with Steinhafel, they both "have decided it is the right time for new leadership at Target."
    
The company's stock fell more than 3 percent Monday morning.
    
Target, based in Minneapolis, said Chief Financial Officer John Mulligan has been appointed interim president and CEO. Roxanne S. Austin, a member of Target's board, has been named as interim nonexecutive chair of the board. Both will serve in those roles until permanent replacements are named.
    
Steinhafel will serve in an advisory capacity during the transition. Jim Johnson remains lead independent director on the board.
    
"He was the face of the public breach. The company struggled to recover from it," said Cynthia Larose, chair of the privacy and security practice at the law firm Mintz Levin. "It's a new era for boards to take a proactive role in understanding what the risks are."


    
Steinhafel's tenure has been tested with many challenges, from a weak economy to a proxy fight. The company, known for its cheap chic clothing and home decor, has seen uneven sales since the recession ended and has battled a perception that its prices aren't as low as its rivals.
    
Under Steinhafel's leadership, the company has won kudos for expanding into fresh groceries and offered a 5 percent discount to customers who use its branded debit and credit cards.  In 2009, he successfully defended the company against a proxy fight against activist hedge fund manager William Ackman, who was pushing his own slate of candidates to the board.
    
But the company recently has been faced with fiercer competition from Amazon.com and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. Recently, difficulties with expansion in Canada, Target's first foray outside the U.S., has hurt profits. But the breach was the biggest black eye on Steinhafel's tenure.
    
"Ultimately, too much rained down on Gregg Steinhafel," said Brian Sozzi, CEO and chief equities strategist at Belus Capital Advisors. "There was no way he could escape the black vortex of news."
    
In March, Target said in it annual report that the breach has spawned dozens of legal actions and said it can't estimate how big the financial tab will be. It also acknowledged separately that security software picked up on suspicious activity after the cyber attack was launched, but the company decided not to take immediate action because it believed it did not warrant immediate follow-up.
    
Target's response since disclosing the breach has included free credit monitoring for affected customers and and overhaul of security systems.
    
"The last several months have tested Target in unprecedented ways," Steinhafel wrote in a letter to the board that was made available to The Associated Press. "From the beginning, I have been committed to ensuring Target emerges from the data breach a better company, more focused than ever on delivering for our guests."
    
The board said it has hired consultant Korn/Ferry International to search for a new CEO.
    
Steinhafel's departure comes two months after the company announced that Chief Information Officer Beth Jacob resigned. Last week, Target named Bob DeRodes, who has 40 years of experience in information technology, as its new chief information officer.
    
Target said it is continuing its search for a chief information security officer and a chief compliance officer.
    
Target also said last week that MasterCard Inc. will provide its branded credit and debit cards with a more secure chip-and-PIN technology next year. That will make Target the first major U.S. retailer to have store cards with this technology.
    
Steinhafel has faced increasing pressure since it was revealed on Dec. 19 that a data breach compromised 40 million credit and debit card accounts between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15. Then on Jan. 10, the company said hackers also stole personal information - including names, phone numbers as well as email and mailing addresses - from as many as 70 million customers.
    
The company's board has been meeting with Steinhafel monthly instead of quarterly to oversee Target's response to the breach.
    
When the final tally is in, Target's breach may eclipse the biggest known data breach at a retailer, one disclosed in 2007 at the parent company of TJ Maxx that affected 90 million records.
    
Target reported in February that its fourth-quarter profit fell 46 percent on a revenue decline of 5.3 percent as the breach scared off customers.
    
Target's sales have been recovering as more time passes, but it expects business to be muted for some time. It issued a profit outlook for the current quarter and full year that missed Wall Street estimates because it faces hefty costs related to the breach.
    
Target's shares have been volatile and are down 2.5 percent since the breach was disclosed. Shares fell $1.95 to $60.06 in early afternoon trading.

Target’s board of directors issued the following statement Monday:

Today we are announcing that, after extensive discussions, the board and Gregg Steinhafel have decided that now is the right time for new leadership at Target. Effective immediately, Gregg will step down from his positions as Chairman of the Target board of directors, president and CEO. John Mulligan, Target’s chief financial officer, has been appointed as interim president and chief executive officer. Roxanne S. Austin, a current member of Target’s board of directors, has been appointed as interim non-executive chair of the board.

Both will serve in their roles until permanent replacements are named. We have asked Gregg Steinhafel to serve in an advisory capacity during this transition and he has graciously agreed.

The board is deeply grateful to Gregg for his significant contributions and outstanding service throughout his notable 35-year career with the company. We believe his passion for the team and relentless focus on the guest have established Target as a leader in the retail industry.

Gregg has created a culture that fosters innovation and supports the development of new ideas. Under his leadership, the company has not only enhanced its ability to execute, but has broadened its strategic horizons. He also led the company through unprecedented challenges, navigating the financial recession, reacting to challenges with Target’s expansion into Canada, and successfully defending the company through a high-profile proxy battle.

Most recently, Gregg led the response to Target’s 2013 data breach. He held himself personally accountable and pledged that Target would emerge a better company. We are grateful to him for his tireless leadership and will always consider him a member of the Target family.

The board will continue to be actively engaged with the leadership team to drive Target’s future success and will manage the transition. In addition to the appointments of the exceptional leaders noted above, we have also retained Korn Ferry to advise the board on a comprehensive CEO search.

The board is confident in the future of this company and views this transition as an opportunity to drive Target’s business forward and accelerate the company’s transformation efforts.

Target President and CEO Resignation Letter by KSTPTV

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

Target announced Monday that Chairman, President and CEO Gregg Steinhafel agreed to step down, effective immediately. He also resigned from the board of directors.
In this Feb. 4 photo, John Mulligan of Target is sworn-in on Capitol Hill in Washington prior to testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on data breaches and combating cybercrime.
Photo: AP/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

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