"Hex House" Could Be Used For Refugees, Natural Disaster Victims

September 15, 2017 10:26 PM

Walk through the door of a Hex House and it feels like any other home. A living room opens up to a kitchen, with two bedrooms cornered toward the back of the house near a bathroom.

But the hexagon-shaped structure is meant to be a pop-up emergency shelter, according to the architects who came up with the concept.

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Architects for Society designed the Hex House with the recent refugee crisis in Europe in mind.

"We were trying to develop something that has a small footprint that could be deployed quickly and built by the end users themselves," Architects for Society Executive Director Amro Sallam said. "It's something that's a little bit more medium and long-term solution."

Hex House is ideal for refugee camps or natural disaster recovery, where victims often times have nothing left but are in need of long-term housing solutions.

"It's not a tent that you have to replace every six months," Sallam said. "This  is what we build normal houses out of."

A single Hex House unit floor plan features two bedrooms, but Sallam said the shape creates a unique opportunity to link multiple units together to build a larger structure.

"We proposed this solution, which we called the 'snowflake,'" Sallam said. "The modularity here takes advantage of the hex to create semi-public semi-private spaces."

The Hex House is on display at Augsburg University, as part of the 29th annual Nobel Peace Prize Forum through Sunday.

Credits

Kirsten Swanson

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